Dapo Ayoola, Chief Executive Officer, Sub-Sahara Africa Upstream Oil and Gas Summit and Exhibition.

Sub-Sahara oil and gas industry professionals will discuss regulatory reforms and major issues faced by the oil and gas industry with a focus on East Africa at the upcoming Sub Saharan Africa upstream oil and gas summit and exhibition in Nairobi, Kenya.

This uniquely placed platform for the oil and gas professionals in Sub Sahara Africa will be held from July 24 to 26 at the prestigious Serena Hotel, Nairobi.

“Like in any sector, the challenges are there but the way we are approaching the challenges is focusing on opportunities and talking to regulators. If regulators are upfront with investors by telling them what they need to do and then we get a checklist, that’s all an investor wants to know.

The investor wants to know what the challenges are and that’s why on the 25 we will be bringing key regulators to come and talk to investors and say, “this is what we’d be asking of you” ” Says Dapo Ayoola, Chief Executive Officer of Sub-Sahara Africa upstream oil and gas summit and exhibition.

“The other challenge is funding. On the other hand, is technology. In terms of manpower, Nigerians are as brilliant as any other part of the world. What we have not been able to put together is our own funding mechanism. Another issue we have not perfected is technology.

We know that if you have the right personnel, you know the fiscal policies of the country, then you can bring a huge pocket to your advantage, then you buy the technology and then we have the capacity to deliver.” Dapo added.

“At the summit, we will also discuss funding opportunities. Can we pull together as a continent and fund genuine investment opportunities on our soil?” Dapo concluded.


Marketing and communications in the oil and gas industry, once as prehistoric as the basins where oil and gas is found, is advancing dramatically. Social media is beginning to propel this industry and its marketing and communications function forward. Despite previous roadblocks from companies’ internal legal departments and fear of the unknown, many oil and gas companies are now active on several digital channels — LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.
An industry without a clear, strong voice in the past is now employing digital channels to communicate more effectively. Social media allows the companies not only to promote their activities, but also to educate and engage with key constituents, including the public, media, governments and other stakeholders.
Social media marketing resources vary greatly, though — while some have large, dedicated social media teams, it remains an afterthought for others. Independents with limited or no marketing staff have begun to rely on outside agencies to help with social media campaigns. Most international oil companies (IOCs) have large social media teams and are prolific on some digital channels, but don’t count out national oil companies (NOCs) or oilfield services companies from the social media mix. NOCs are beginning to understand they need to educate the world for further energy investment into their countries. Social media is a perfect channel for them to connect with investors since developed countries are very active on digital channels.
The messages vary from recruiting for jobs and community news to earnings releases and general company activities. More oil and gas companies are using social media for educational purposes, especially on politically charged topics like hydraulic fracturing (or fracking), LNG exporting and building the Keystone pipeline. There is a lot of misinformation about the industry, and social media allows the industry to respond faster and communicate the facts. This has become critical in the case of crisis communications.
Companies wanting to stay out of political discussions are focused on community relations and recruitment. They are often tweeting about jobs, and some even have dedicated Twitter feeds to share job opportunities. The majority of oil and gas companies contribute large amounts to charity, and these companies are increasingly using social media to spread the word. Rather than just posting their charitable giving on a web page or not communicating it outside the company’s walls, they are actively posting photos of employees at charity events, and even setting up Facebook albums to showcase event photos. Oil and gas companies are more active in the community than ever before through special programs and participation in community events and social media is taking their programs to the next level.
Companies are also now relying on employees to help promote their brand in a positive manner through social channels. Only a few are starting to invest internally in social training, but most large companies have social media policies in place. It is very important to have set policies to govern what employees post and to take appropriate action when employees do not adhere to the policy. Those more advanced in social media are starting brand ambassador programs and various Twitter feeds that show daily life working for their company, which also helps to connect with millennials. Due to the industry’s rapidly aging workforce, social media is a powerful way to engage the energy workforce of the future. Niche online communities for oil and gas professionals are growing and helping to attract younger generations into the industry. On-campus industry recruiters and associations with student chapters are utilizing social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, to educate and engage with them about all facets of working in oil and gas.
Several studies show LinkedIn prevails as the predominant tool used for business-to-business communications and the oil and gas industry is no exception. Many companies have active LinkedIn company pages where they regularly post updates. Oil and gas companies are now beginning to set up their own LinkedIn groups in addition to their existing company pages to better engage constituents. Rather than pushing marketing content, LinkedIn groups allow them to facilitate technical discussions and really engage with customers, employees, industry professionals and potential recruits. A few IOCs have set up groups as a platform to exchange ideas and hold discussions around innovation, new technologies and future trends.
Although the oil and gas industry is still charting its course through social waters, it has come a long way quickly. The industry needs to take social media to the next level. For example, an industry that has long since mastered the trade show is still not fully utilizing social media during events. In addition, very few oil and gas companies are currently on Google+ and are just beginning to create mobile applications.
Now is the time for oil and gas companies to fully embrace social media and what digital channels have to offer. Exploration into social media has ended and the real development begins. Oil and gas companies need to invest in a strategic digital program to monitor and engage with their audience like any
other business in order to truly gain the benefits they seek for their stakeholders and the industry.

 

 

Dapo Ayoola, C.E.O Zenith Professional Training

Zenith Professional Training, organizer of the annual Sub Saharan Africa Upstream Oil and Gas Summit has said its forthcoming conference will seek to exploit the opportunities in the East African oil and gas industry with a special focus on Tanzania.

In a statement by its Chief Executive Officer, Oladapo Ayoola, the company said the conference will provide opportunities for an exchange of ideas on best practices between investors and regulators across the region.

He said, “From April 9-11, 2019, we will discuss the unique investment opportunities in East Africa with a focus on Tanzania.  We are asking PURA (Petroleum Upstream Regulatory Authority) of Tanzania to come and tell us what we need to do for a successful investment.

“We have asked the CEO of Petroleum Commission of Ghana to come and talk to us. This is because if investors know what the fiscal policies are and what the procedures are, it will be easier for them.

“The theme for 2019 is ‘Gearing up for Growth: Sub Sahara Africa Oil, Gas and Power Value Chain.”

“The highlight of that will be a focus on Tanzania and the east African bloc. This year’s summit will provide opportunities for practitioners and investors to showcase what we already have, exchange ideas on what we are doing rightly and what we can learn from each other-West Africa learning from east Africa, east Africa copying best practices from West Africa and South Africa.

“Nigeria is a success story of so many indigenous entrepreneurs who have gone not just into downstream but Exploration and production. We have many success stories to take to the rest of Africa. From Eroton, Aiteo, Amni, Seplat among others.”

According to him, a major challenge to the continent’s growth in the sector is the lack of sustainable funding mechanism.

He said, “Like any other sector, the challenges are there but the way we are approaching the challenges is focusing on opportunities and talking to regulators. If regulators are upfront with investors by telling them what they need to do and then we get a checklist, that’s all an investor wants to know.

“At the summit, we will also discuss funding opportunities. Can we pull together as a continent and fund genuine investment opportunities on our soil?

“In terms of manpower, Nigerians are as brilliant as any other part of the world. What we have not been able to put together is our own funding mechanism.

“Another issue we have not perfected is technology. We know that if you have the right personnel, you know the fiscal policies of the country, then you can bring a huge pocket to your advantage, then you buy the technology and then we have the capacity to deliver,” he stated.

Speaking on the gains of past events, he said, “Despite it being an up and coming platform, we are beginning to see the impact.

“Specifically, during the first edition in 2015, Nigeria Petroleum Exchange (NIPEX) was there and they had a stand. We had a gentleman there from Uganda.

“Today, NIPEX is consulting for Uganda regulators, supporting them on how to start a Petroleum Exchange which will be the first in East Africa. This is a nation to nation benefit.

There are also individuals who are consultants who have met and relationships formed for mutual commercial benefits.

“Last year, we broke new grounds. We brought about 25 oil and gas host community members who came to the platform to say what they would like to see and how best they can make the relationship between them and oil  companies a beneficial one.

“We also introduced Women in Petroleum forum. The leadership in the petroleum sector is male dominated. I have a brilliant young daughter in the university who I’d like to be given a fair level playing ground. One point we made last year was to explain that even if that young girl is studying finance, there is a place for her in oil and gas.

“A popular misconception is that one need to study engineering to work in Oil and Gas but there is someone who runs the Administration, Community engagement, finance and IT. It is a basket where everything must be present for the smooth running of the organization.  We are saying the girl child has a place in the oil and gas.

“So, we are calling on women who have achieved success in the oil and gas industry to mentor young ladies right from the university. We are widening the platform as part of our own contribution,” he added.

“There is no reason why Tanzania should be going in search of consultants in Europe when Nigeria has 60 years experience. You can imagine the number of people who have retired with the wealth of experience.

“Why are we not sharing best practice? Why importing from somewhere where they don’t understand our peculiar community challenges? This is the platform for the future.